Memories of Pulling Tobacco, a Labor of Love

  written by T. EDWARD NICKENS PHOTOGRAPH BY NED LEARY Bobby Joe Fisher got it right, I think. But let me say this: I really don’t know what I’m talking about. We’re sitting at the McDonald’s in Battleboro, on U.S. Highway 301, right there at Wesleyan College, and he’s remembering all those times he rode … Continue reading Memories of Pulling Tobacco, a Labor of Love

Did the Lost Colony live at “Site X”? Clues point the way.

By Jeff Hampton The Virginian-Pilot ELIZABETH CITY, N.C. Evidence is mounting that at least part of John White’s lost colony may have ended up in Bertie County. Archaeologists have excavated 850 square feet of the tract in question and found dozens of artifacts including bale seals used to verify cloth quality; 16th-century nails; firing pans … Continue reading Did the Lost Colony live at “Site X”? Clues point the way.

Arnold House restoration set to begin

Community comes together to save their history! From The News Leader, Staunton, VA: WAYNESBORO — After years of waiting to see if the red brick house on New Hope Road would be knocked down or restored, Waynesboro City Council voted in May not to demolish the house and to hand it over to Mark Holmes for restoration. … Continue reading Arnold House restoration set to begin

Civil War buttons stolen from Brunswick historic site

  By Christina Haley on July 12, 2016 Three Civil War artifacts were stolen from the Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site during a break-in at the site early Sunday morning. The break-in was reported at the historic site located at 8884 St. Phillips Road, in Winnabow, at 2:17 a.m., according an incident report from the Brunswick County … Continue reading Civil War buttons stolen from Brunswick historic site

How the South Cornered the Soda Market

[Photograph: Library of Congress] If you've ever looked into the history of soft drinks in America, you may have noticed that a surprisingly large number of them originated in the South. Coca-Cola, for instance, was created by Dr. John S. Pemberton in Atlanta in 1886. Its archrival, Pepsi, was invented by Caleb Bradham in the late … Continue reading How the South Cornered the Soda Market

Romantic story of shipwrecked Confederate spy is true, mostly

  It's one of the more glamorous stories of the Cape Fear coast: The glamorous Confederate spy is riding a blockade runner back into Wilmington. Her ship runs aground and she drowns in the Atlantic -- weighed down by treasure sewn in the linings of her gown. That legend is almost true -- sort of, … Continue reading Romantic story of shipwrecked Confederate spy is true, mostly

DPLA Workshop: DPLA for Genealogy and Family History, July 26, 2016 at 3:00pm EST

Following the recent announcement of our partnership with FamilySearch, we are pleased to invite our extended community to attend a free DPLA workshop webinar — DPLA for Genealogy and Family History, taking place on July 26, 2016 at 3:00pm EST. In this hour-long workshop webinar, DPLA Community Reps and experienced genealogists Tamika Maddox Strong and Amy Johnson Crow will introduce DPLA as a resource … Continue reading DPLA Workshop: DPLA for Genealogy and Family History, July 26, 2016 at 3:00pm EST

Decoding the Civil War

In a move to gain new insights into the U.S. Civil War, The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today the public launch of an innovative crowdsourcing project to transcribe and decipher a collection of nearly 16,000 Civil War telegrams between Abraham Lincoln, his Cabinet, and officers of the Union Army. Roughly one-third … Continue reading Decoding the Civil War

Trees of Wilson, June 2016, Vol. 25, No. 6

Contents of the June issue of Trees of Wilson include: Planning for Research Trips Hassell-Gary Wedding Tomlinson School John Cornelius Robbins Family Obituaries (continued) Howard Cemetery Romance in the News (late 19th–early 20th century wedding announcements) WCGS Minutes & Announcements Trees of Wilson is on summer hiatus and will return in August. Happy Independence Day!

Legal Drink Milestone in Wilson

This Day in North Carolina History

abc-store-marker

On July 2, 1935, the state’s first Alcoholic Beverage Commission—ABC, for short—Store opened in Wilson to an excited public. The store offered legal alcohol in the state for the first time in 26 years.

On its first day of operation, shoppers at the store purchased 825 bottles of liquor at a total cost of $1,003. There were no reports of rowdiness or drinking on the premises as had been predicted by prohibitionists.

Prohibition had been in effect in North Carolina since 1909, after voters in a referendum approved a ban on the sale of alcoholic beverages. North Carolina was the first state in the nation to approve such a measure and did so by the wide margin of 62 to 38 percent.

The rest of the nation joined North Carolina in 1920 with the passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, which made it illegal to manufacture, sell or transport intoxicating liquors…

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